Categories
Agnes Jamieson Gallery Exhibitions

Truss

Truss
by Carey Jernigan

Agnes Jamieson Gallery
September 29 – November 28, 2020

Jernigan’s work features wood, light, and memory. She explores industrial processes, material culture, and the people and places they shape.

Artist Bio

Carey trained as a furniture maker with Heidi Earnshaw Design (2012 – 2017). ​In 2015, Carey was the recipient of the RBC Emerging Artists Studio Setup Award. ​Her exhibition, Patternmaker, with Julia Campbell-Such, made Canadian Art’s Must-Sees list in September 2016. The Hamilton Arts Council invited Carey to reflect on Patternmaker and her previous work for its Echo Artist Talks series.

Artist WEBSITE

Exhibition Images

Images coming soon

Categories
Agnes Jamieson Gallery Exhibitions

Navigations of Iron

Navigations of Iron
by Gary Blundell

Agnes Jamieson Gallery
August 12 – September 26, 2020

Between 1870 and 1900, there was a great hope that the iron ore found between Kinmount and Tory Hill would bring prosperity to the area. Many men came here seeking the location of valuable iron deposits, digging test holes in the ground and setting up mine sites. The most notable was Chalres Pusey, who as a young man had worked for the new railways in both England and the United States. He came in hopes of becoming a true mining and railway baron. Sadly, despite setting up a home here, building a church in Irondale and the IB&O Railway linking Howland Junction to Bancroft, the iron deposits were poor at best and the entire venture went from hopeful to abandoned.

The area today is littered the the remains of these activities. The mine test-holes and mine sites can be found throughout the woodlands. There are still the remains of railway beams, intact bridges and decaying waiting rooms.

As an artist interested in the collision between human and natural patterning on the Earth’s surface this local endeavor has intrigued Gary Blundell since moving here in 2000. This exhibition is all about what remains.

Artist Bio

E. G. Blundell was born in London, England and immigrated to Canada in 1962. Gary is a hyrdogeoloist by training and has a degree in Earth Sciences. In 2014 he received the Chalmers Fellowship. His work has been exhibited across the country, the UK and can be found in numerous public and private collections throughout Canada.

Artist WEBSITE

Videos

Exhibition Images

Victoria Long Pit (2020)
Gary Blundell

oil on wood 42″ x 40″


Waiting Room (2019)
Gary Blundell

gouache and pencil on paper 11″ x 15″

Stonehenge paper, pen and ink

Howland Pit No. 1 (2019)
Gary Blundell

oil on wood 40″ x 42″

Categories
Agnes Jamieson Gallery Exhibitions

Interlace

Interlace
by Carolyn Wren

Agnes Jamieson Gallery

Carolyn Wren offers three parts to this exhibition. In the large gallery area handwritten in cursive, the transcribed text of Virginia Woolf’s “A Room of One’s Own” (1929) was lovingly embroidered by many women. Sixty-four 3’ x 5’ panels were sewn together to revive Woolf’s extended essay. The work appears to come from out of the wall and spill around the room, mimicking a factory production. The second installation, “Lost Knowledge”, also involves cursive writing. Exhibited in the hallway, this display becomes a transition from “A Room of One’s One” and The Ghost of Emily.  It ties the threads between embroidered work and crochet work revealing the base line nascent in Wren’s practice. The work represents Wren’s need to remember by obsessively writing out the first few pages of books , she attempts to collect, preserve, honour, and ritualized knowledge.  The third installation involves a wall-mounted display of words, suspended by pins, and created by crocheting, the entire poem by Emily Dickinson “Because I could not stop for Death”.

With Carolyn Wren’s exhibition is a selection of Andre Lapine work, some of which are original letters written by Lapine to his dear friend Annette Brunelle and her family.

Artist Bio

Born in St. Catharines, Ontario, Carolyn Wren studied visual art at the University of Western Ontario. Wren has been exploring themes of lost knowledge and metanarratives in her recent work of transcribing iconic texts to create her installations. In the past she has used relief print methods and processes in non-traditional ways. Key exhibitions include: Rodman Hall Art Centre- Brock University. Kelowna Art Gallery. The University of Sherbrooke. Cram International Gallery, St. Catharines. Open Studio, Toronto. Linen Biennale- Portneuf, Quebec. She has been exhibiting her work since 1990 in group and solo shows across Canada in public galleries and in artist-run centres.

VIDEOS

A Room of One’s Own
Lost Knowledge
Emily’s Ghost

Exhibition images

A Room of One’s Own (detail)
Carolyn Wren
Installation: canvas, embroidery floss, thread (2019)


Lost Knowledge
Carolyn Wren
(Books I haven’t Read series, Cabin Library series, and Ruth’s Library series)

Stonehenge paper, pen and ink

The Ghost of Emily
Carolyn Wren
Installation: yarn, glue pins  (2020)

Categories
Museum & Heritage Village recipe

Grapefruit Marmalade from Cathy’s grandmother

Thank you to Cathy Mc for contributing this lovely recipe from her grandmother’s recipe box. Cathy’s radio program ‘Food Family and Friends’ runs at 9am on Wednesdays on 100.9 Canoe FM. We’ll be adding a few items from this treasure trove of handwritten recipes!

Grapefruit Marmalade Recipe

Ingredients
3 Grapefruits
3 Lemons
20 Cups boiling water
8 Lbs granulated sugar

  • Cut grapefruit and lemons very thin, using all by the seeds and white skin of grapefruit
  • Pour over it the 20 cups of boiling water and let stand 48 hours
  • Add sugar and cook until jello. About half an hour


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Museum & Heritage Village recipe

Banana Bread Recipe, from 1943 Joy of Cooking

Thank you to Sandra Quigley for contributing this lovely recipe!

This recipe is from my grandmother’s copy of ‘The Joy of Cooking’. She signed it in 1949. The book falls open to this page. It works every time!

– Sandra

1943 Joy of Cooking Banana Bread Recipe

Banana Bread 

Recipe from the 1943 edition

This recipe is easily doubled or tripled if you have lots of ripe bananas. Loaves freeze well too.

 (In mixer)
Cream until light:
¾ cup sugar
¼ cup butter

Beat until light and stir in:
1 egg

Beat in:
2/3 cup bananas (about 2 medium sized bananas mashed with a fork)

(In one bowl)
Sift before measuring:
2 cups bread flour

Resift with:
½ teaspoon(t) baking powder
½ t baking soda
¼ t salt

(In a separate bowl):
3 Tablespoons (T) sour milk or buttermilk
Note: you can make sour milk by adding a little lemon juice to regular milk

Add contents of these two bowls to mixer 1/3 at a time, alternating between Flour and Milk mixtures. ie: 1/3 of the Flour mixture, then 1 T of sour milk, then second 1/3 of the Flour mixture and the second T of sour milk…just until blended only.

You may add chocolate chips or crushed nuts if you like.

Place batter in a greased 8 x 4 loaf pan.

Bake at 350o for about 1 hour.


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